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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 92 (some duplicates have been removed)
states, including texas and florida. that could mean four million fewer people would qualify for medicaid. governors in eight other states have also said they leaning toward opting out. health and human services secretary kathleen sebelius said today she has received letters from a dozen governors who support another part of the law- - the creation of the insurance exchanges that allow consumers to compare health plans. but the medicaid expansion remains an expensive sore spot for others. in nevada, we turn to jon ralston, political columnist, the "las vegas sun." in texas, to emily ramshaw, editor of the "texas tribune," and here with an overview in washington, to margot sanger- katz, health care correspondent for "national journal." march go, i want to start with you. give us a sense in general about what this resistance is about, who is resisting and why. >> i think there are two main reasons why we're seeing resistance from governors, one i think is political. they don't like the health care reform law, they have made arguments against it all along and this is a way of rejecting it an
in on us. >> woodruff: and in houston, texas, they sent ballplayers scrambling for cover. the scares come after high temperatures are being blamed for at least 46 deaths and loss of power for close to a million people last week. for over 11 consecutive days, temperatures exceeded 100 degrees across much of the country. meanwhile, out west, wildfires fueled by near-record droughts have raged for weeks in colorado, forcing residents to leave their homes. nationwide, fires burned 1.3 million acres in june alone, the second highest acreage burned in june of any year. now, the national oceanic and atmospheric administration, noaa, is reporting the first half of this year was in fact the hottest on record, with 170 all-time heat records matched or broken. noaa has issued a report attempting to assess the role climate change, including human factors, played, if any, in six global extreme weather events in 2011. about one of those, the report asked if the human influence on climate made the 2011 texas drought more probable? it concluded that it did. the report also examined climate change's role
on a prisoner last night in texas-- the state that executes more convicts than any other. >> suarez: as delegates arrive in washington for an international aids conference, we have two progress reports: gwen ifill gets an update from the director of the united nations program on aids. >> brown: anwe assess e epidemic he in our nation's capital, where the infection rate is the highest in the country. >> we have people who will be tested repeatedly in hopes that one of those tests will be negative so that they can say i don't have h.i.v. we have people who think they can pray their h.i.v. away. >> suarez: plus, as part of his ongoing series, hari sreenivasan talks with native americans about the search for solutions to the effects of climate change on their tribal lands. >> brown: that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." major funding fothpbs nehour has been providedy: and the william and flora hewlett foundation, working to solve social and environmental problems at home and around the world. and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... this program was
. >> sreenivasan: arguments began today in u.s. district court in washington over whether texas can require voters to show photo identification at polling places. the obama administration blocked the law last year saying it was unfair to minority voters. texas then sued the u.s. government citing political motives. the law is one of several recent disputes over the 1965 voting rights act, which prohibits discriminatory voting practices. the supreme court upheld a similar photo i.d. law in indiana in 2009. nearly 50 years after their plane went down, the remains of six airmen who disappeared during the vietnam war were buried at arlington national cemetery today. the remains were buried in a single casket, after being discovered last year by american and laotion search teams. for decades, family members knew only that the plane sent out a "mayday" signal while flying over laos. all six servicemen were given posthumous promotions by the military. on wall street today, stocks slipped in a light day of trading. the dow jones industrial average lost 36 points to close at 12,736. the nasdaq fell re than
. at a house hearing today, republican lamar smith of texas insisted the change will do more harm than good. $the administration's amnesty agenda is a win for illegal immigrant bus a loss for americas. when illegal immigrants are allowed to live and work in the u.s. u.s., unemployed american workers have to compete with illegal immigrants for scarce jobs. with 23 million americans unemployed or underemployed, this amnesty only makes their lives harder. >> holman: napolitano argued the change will give young immigrants a pathway to citizenship and let law enforcement make better use of resources. >> it's not amnesty. what this is is... it's really the development that we have been looking at over the last several years of how do we clear out the backlog of non-priority cases so that we can focus on criminals, recent border crossers, repeat violators. >> holman: the new policy could affect more than a million illegal immigrants in the u.s. the u.s. is on track to have the worst year for whooping cough in more than five decades. the centers for disease and control and prevention said today tha
merrow reports on a texas school district's approach to its high school drop-out crisis: luring students back with college courses. >> what we're looking at doing is doing education in a different way, where the colleges come together with us and start working with these young people while they're still in high school. >> suarez: judy woodruff looks back at the major decisions in this high-impact supreme court term with historian michael beschloss and marcia coyle of the "national law journal." >> ifill: and on this most american of holidays, we turn to the men who signed the declaration of independence and what happened to them after they did. >> they were placed under house arrest. they had-- they were allowed to write letters home. they were visited by physicians. no one was ever tortured. that's something i have seen over the years and it is wrong. every time i see it, i shudder. >> ifill: that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: ♪ ♪ moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. and with the ongoing
of an austin, texas, neighborhood that uses "smart grid" technology to track and control its energy consumption. >> the fishers have two solar volume dayic power system, sophisticated digital metres and state of the art thermostats that allow them to fine-tune their indoor climate here orion line when they're away. >> we >> woodruff: we update the presidential campaign as the candidates trade shots over outsourcing jobs. >> brown: mark shields and michael gerson analyze the week's news. >> woodruff: and we close with a report from south sudan about a flood of refugees fleeing the violence, only to encounter grim conditions in camps on the border. >> they don't have much reserve, they have been walking for six weeks, four weeks, six weeks so it is a very vulnerable group and it is the little kids and elderly are the ones that suffer the most. >> woodruff: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: bnsf carnegie corporation and with the >> ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... >> this program was made possible by the
go awry. >> suarez: john merrow reports on a low income texas school district's approach to its drop-out crisis: a taste of college and hard work. >> so we're offering something that's more challenging to them, and telling them, "step up. you can have college now. it is free. it's your future. what do you want?" >> woodruff: plus, jeffrey brown talks to master storeller jack hitt about his latest project and making his mark as a self- employed writer. >> the question i get every time i go see my mom and i still get it. she'll always ask me this question, "so when are you going to get a job?" and the answer is: "it's okay, mom. i'm never going to get a job. this is the job!" >> woodruff: that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> growing up in arctic norway, everybody took fish oil to stay healthy. when i moved to the united states almost 30 years ago, i could not find an omega-3 fish oil that worked for me. i became inspired to bring a new definition of fish oil quality to the world. today, nordic naturals is working to fulfi
headquarters in irving, texas. molly hennessey-fiske of the los angeles times is following the decision and the reaction to it. she joins us from houston. molly, tell us a bit more about the boy scouts explanation for why they are reaffirming this policiment policy -- policy, what are they saying. >> it's interesting the announcement made yesterday. reaffirmed the policy, it reiterated what had already been said and it came at a time as you mentioned when they're having these protests and high profile appearances by jennifer turrell and others who have been outed as gay scout leaders or gay scouts. so the reaffirmation were seen by observers who i talked to yesterday as just sort of reaffirming of the character of the scouts as a more conservative organization. some of the observers who i talked to who were, has been involved in scouting, had followed scouting for decades said this just indicated how intertwined the boy scouts of america, had come with some religious organizations that sponsor a lot of troops. that this was sort of both a moral decision but also a business decision as w
looked at six of the most populous states, california, texas, illinois, virginia, new jersey and new york. the problems they face include growing medicaid spending and pension liabilities at a time when state revenues and federal grants aren't keeping pace. and it's to the last of these issues-- the fiscal problems of the states-- that we go into more detail on now. richard ravitch joins us. a former lieutenant governor of new york, he co-chaired the task force issuing today's report with former fed chairman paul volcker. also with us is susan urahn, managing director of the pew center on the states. >> dirk ravitch what jumps out is the situation is much worse than thought, much worse than states are willing to admit and worse than anybody seems to have a grasp on what to do. am i overstating these problems? >> no, you're not. and it's a function arising from things. one, there are basic expenditures like medicaid and retirement expenditures which are growing at a faster rate in state and local revenues. number two, states for a long long time had been using gimmicky to balance their bud
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 92 (some duplicates have been removed)